Book Review: Prince of the Sun, Princess of the Moon

Updated: Aug 31, 2019



Review of Prince of the Sun, Princess of the Moon

Book Review by Andrea Hargrove

Joshua and Deborah Delango are two siblings living a quiet life in a remote village on the world of Geon. Although Deborah doesn’t know it yet, she and her brother are exiled royalty, displaced after a palace coup. She finds out the truth when various celestial bodies start acting oddly, and the Guardian of the moon visits her to warn her that the planet is in danger. The prince and princess take her words to heart, and they immediately begin a quest to save Geon while dodging those who would want to destroy them.

At its heart, Prince of the Sun, Princess of the Moon is a story about family, and the relationships between characters are as much in focus as the ongoing mission. As one would expect, Joshua and Deborah are a large part of this. While they occasionally disagree or bicker as most siblings do, they clearly care about each other very much and are always ready to protect each other from the threats around them. They and the rest of their family also struggle with the ideas of trust and forgiveness as they meet characters with questionable motives who offer to help them along their way.

Unfortunately, the characters didn’t grow or change much as the story progressed; they mostly just moved along from one part of the journey to the next. It was also difficult to get completely invested in the journey since it wasn’t clear until very late in the book how Joshua and Deborah’s journey would help save Geon in the first place. Some aspects even remained unclear by the end of the book, like the hierarchy of the celestial Guardians and royal figures and why the book is subtitled “Rulers of the Galaxy” if nothing outside of one solar system is ever mentioned.

These and other world building issues may be minor flaws to some. It’s still a clean read that doesn’t have much to give a parent pause apart from some minor fantasy action and violence. It even touches on some worthwhile themes, as mentioned above. If a middle school student is looking for a fantasy story about kids saving the world, this is one guilt-free option that could answer that need.

About the Book

For years the Moon Palace in the Valley of Aijalon and the Sun Tower in the Plains of Jashar has stood as testaments to the power of the sun and the graciousness of the moon. Helio and Lumina, Guardians of the sun and moon, kept watch over them and the Prince and the Princess who ruled them. But the Prince and Princess are missing, and the sun is exhibiting strange behavior.


Now Joshua and his younger sister, Deborah, must untangle a web of lies and deceit to uncover the secret of who they really are and save their world from an imminent disaster brewing in the heavens. And they must hurry. Between the earthquakes, the sun and moon standing still in the sky, and the planet Jants hovering closer than it’s ever been, the planet could be torn apart before they have a chance to do something about it.

About the Author


M.R. Anglin was born in Jamaica and migrated to the US when she was young.


"Fanfiction" has a particular place in her heart since she started by writing fanfics. She enjoys writing YA and middle grade fiction.


About the Reviewer


Andrea Hargrove is a librarian and recent author from Eastern Pennsylvania. She received her BA in English from Cedar Crest College and MS in Library Science from Clarion University, and recently, her first short story “The Fairy Maze” was accepted for publication in the Zimbell House Anthology A Nymph’s Tale, due out late February 2018.

Disclosure: The reviewer received a free copy for an honest review. All opinions are her own.


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