Meghan’s Corner: Mexican Street Corn

Mexican Street Corn

by Meghan E. White


There is nothing like fresh, local corn in the summer. Grilled, and covered in butter has always been my favorite way to eat it. I now have a new favorite way to enjoy corn on the cob. Mexican Street Corn, or elote, is so delicious I may never go back to plain old butter. This fantastic portable concoction is a common street food in Mexico. It’s covered in a creamy sauce and coated with cotija cheese. After my first bite I was hooked, and I think you will be too.


Corn and Mexico have a long history. In America we are used to the standard golden kernels that we find at farmers markets and grocery stores. In Mexico corn can be white, red, yellow, blue, and black. Some ears even have several colors. There are fifty-nine varieties of corn native to Mexico. A majority of Mexican farmers still save their seeds and plant native strains. Corn is a big deal in Mexico.


Street food is a big deal in Mexico too. No trip south of the border is complete without it.


With the trend of food trucks, much of this street food can be found here in the U.S. at local markets and fairs. Or, you can make this deliciousness at home. It cooks up quickly on the grill.


“For he satisfies the thirsty and fills the hungry with good things.” (Psalm 107:9,NIV)


Happy eating!


Grilled Mexican Street Corn


¼ cup mayonnaise

¼ cup sour cream

1 garlic clove minced

Juice of 1 lime

1 teaspoon chili powder

6 ears of corn

½ cup crumbled cotija cheese

¼ cup chopped cilantro


1. Preheat a gas or charcoal grill to 400°.


2. In a small bowl combine mayonnaise, sour cream, garlic, lime juice, and chili powder.


3. Place husked corn directly onto grill grates. Grill for several minutes on each side until the kernels turn golden and charred. Remove corn from the grill onto a plate.


4. Using a brush spread the cream mixture on all sides of the corn.


5. Sprinkle with cotija cheese and cilantro.


Notes:


*I folded back the husks and tied with twine. It creates a pretty handle.


*Feta or Parmesan cheese can replace cotija cheese.


* Mexican crema, which is slightly salty, can be used instead of sour cream.


*You may want to add a little salt if you use sour cream.

About the Author


Meghan was born in Southern California where she spent most of her youth. After several moves during her childhood, she ended up in Oregon, where she stayed for many years. Meghan never dreamed of being a writer, but God told her to write about Joey. After a few years of writing, it was time for a change of scenery. So, Meghan, her husband, and two sons picked up and moved to Texas. If you listen close you might catch her saying “Ya’ll” from time to time. She loves encouraging kids and adults through writing.


You can read Meghan’s column on the 4th Wednesday each month here at Mustard Seed Sentinel. Connect with Meghan on her blog, Twitter, Instagram, and via email.



#MeghanWhite #Recipes #Dinners #Meals #MeghanCorner #HomeCooking

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